Mechanical Engineering Technology Concentrations

Students pursuing the MET bachelor degree are able to specialize in the area of their choice as a part of the MET curriculum. The concentrations consist of four three-credit hour MET elective classes. MET students also have the option of dual concentrations.  Fifteen (15) hours of MET elective hours is required for your MET major. The MET concentrations require 12 hours of designated course work. The fifth elective, required for the MET major, can be selected from any of the MET elective course offerings.

MET also offers minors in Engineering Design Graphics Technology (16 credit hrs.) and Manufacturing Engineering Technology (15 credit hrs.). The minors are available for non-MET students as well as MET students that want to concentrate in one area but minor in another.

  • The Heating, Ventilating, Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Refrigeration area specializes in the design and operation of heat and mass transfer systems which produce the needed environments for manufacturing operations, industrial processes and human comfort. Systems which utilize mechanical equipment such as pumps, blowers, fans, compressors, and heat exchangers are found in fields as diverse as air conditioning, low temperature metallurgy, food preservation, chemical processing and industrial manufacturing. Graduates of this program are employed as:

    • systems designers for consulting firms and mechanical contractors
    • manufacturers' sales representatives
    • maintenance supervisors

    Energy (Heat Power)

    The Heat/Power area of specialization deals with energy conversion, i.e., the study of internal combustion engines, steam turbines, boilers, air compressors, pumps and fans. The program includes study in thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid mechanics. Graduates with this specialty are employed as:

    • process plant engineers in the petrochemical and pulp and paper industry
    • engineers for power generation plants
    • maintenance supervisors
    • sales representatives for manufacturers
  • The Engineering Design Graphics area of specialization is concerned with integrating the vast capabilities of three-dimensional computer aided design software (3D CAD) into the engineering and design process. Graduates work for engineering and architectural firms; manufacturing industries; research, construction and development companies.

    The MET bachelor degree with an Engineering Design Graphics concentration is obtained by the appropriate selection of elective courses. These courses emphasize a variety of topics in modern engineering graphics and design and are as shown below. To obtain a concentration in Engineering Design Graphics, students must take MET 4112 – Computer Aided Engineering and three of the remaining four courses from the list below. A student may take fewer than four of the courses and elect the General Concentration if desired.

  • The Machine Design area of specialization is concerned with the application of fundamental principles of design to new and existing machines, machine parts and mechanical structures; the fabricating, testing and assembly of components into production of mechanical systems; and the operation of machines and mechanical equipment. Graduates may be employed as:

    • designers of machinery and/or machine parts for the improvement of production operations and cost
    • supervisors of fabricating facilities, manufacturing plants, maintenance and repair shops
    • sales and service representatives of industrial and manufacturing firms
  • The area of specialization called Manufacturing Technology is concerned with manufacturing production processes and operations such as:

    • tool and jig design
    • design and layout of manufacturing facilities
    • machine tool operations
    • computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM)

    We have established a new and modern Automated Manufacturing Laboratory in which students are able to practice on the latest computer controlled machines. Graduates may be employed in areas such as:

    • steel production and fabrication
    • aircraft and automobile fabrication and assembly
    • cable manufacture
    • textile mills

    In fact, there are very few industries that don't employ mechanical engineers and technologists. By selecting a specified sequence of manufacturing courses a student may graduate with a designated Manufacturing Option.

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